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Following their superb Dussek album (5 stars in BBC Music Magazine), Duo Pleyel's Richard Egarr and Alexandra Nepomnyashchaya explore the seminal role a musical father figure can play in shaping another composer. From Mozart's first meeting with Johann Christian Bach (the 'London Bach') as a young boy in England in 1764, an extraordinary musical bond and mutual respect was forged between the two great composers. The life-long influence of the older musician on Mozart is often seriously under-appreciated, yet Mozart quoted musical fragments and themes by Christian throughout his life, none more poignantly than in the slow movement of his A major piano concerto K. 414, written shortly after Christian's death. The program on this recording brings their four-hands music together to show both the influence and individuality of these wonderful composers.
Following their superb Dussek album (5 stars in BBC Music Magazine), Duo Pleyel's Richard Egarr and Alexandra Nepomnyashchaya explore the seminal role a musical father figure can play in shaping another composer. From Mozart's first meeting with Johann Christian Bach (the 'London Bach') as a young boy in England in 1764, an extraordinary musical bond and mutual respect was forged between the two great composers. The life-long influence of the older musician on Mozart is often seriously under-appreciated, yet Mozart quoted musical fragments and themes by Christian throughout his life, none more poignantly than in the slow movement of his A major piano concerto K. 414, written shortly after Christian's death. The program on this recording brings their four-hands music together to show both the influence and individuality of these wonderful composers.
691062065528
Mozarts Real Musical Father
Artist: Mozart / Duo Pleyel
Format: CD
New: Not in stock
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Following their superb Dussek album (5 stars in BBC Music Magazine), Duo Pleyel's Richard Egarr and Alexandra Nepomnyashchaya explore the seminal role a musical father figure can play in shaping another composer. From Mozart's first meeting with Johann Christian Bach (the 'London Bach') as a young boy in England in 1764, an extraordinary musical bond and mutual respect was forged between the two great composers. The life-long influence of the older musician on Mozart is often seriously under-appreciated, yet Mozart quoted musical fragments and themes by Christian throughout his life, none more poignantly than in the slow movement of his A major piano concerto K. 414, written shortly after Christian's death. The program on this recording brings their four-hands music together to show both the influence and individuality of these wonderful composers.
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